Backwoods Summer 2016 Road Trip Report I

OSEIA 2016

By Erika Karnitz VP of Wholesale

I attended the 2016 Oregon Solar Energy Conference (OSEC) on May 4th and 5th in Portland Oregon. The conference drew 380 attendees this year, as opposed to last year’s 251. Each day was chock full of training’s, policy round tables, and networking opportunities.

Tuesday May 3rd kicked off the event with a “solar soiree” in the evening featuring drinks, snacks and a chance to say hi to everyone before we got down to business. Jeff Bissonnette, Executive Director of OSEIA gave an opening speech about the bright future of solar in Oregon.

Wednesday morning started with a keynote address by Rhone Resch, President and CEO of the national Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA). He took a poll of the room and it was interesting to see that many of us had Customer Owned Utility round tablebeen there 5, 10, 15, and even 20+ years. He talked about Oregon Senate Bill 1547, which set as 50% renewable portfolio standard (RPS) by 2040 and requires the elimination of coal-generated electricity in the state power mix.  The bill also creates a community solar program, allowing Oregonians without solar suitable roofs to own a portion of a larger central array and have credits applied to their electricity bills. SEIA expects Oregon have one of the fastest growing solar industries in the country in the coming years.

Wednesday I attended some interesting training’s. The first was a product and technical training by Solarworld. They talked about their new line of high efficiency monocrystalline modules, which are 60 cell and 300W. They are using a 5 busbar technology, which in conjunction with high quality mono cells is enabling them to reach 300W in the same footprint as they have used in the past. Per Solarworld ” By moving from three to five bus bars, the primary electrical contacts that stripe photovoltaic cells, SolarWorld can manufacture cells and modules in which electrons travel shorter distances from grid lines to bus bars and thus enable more to reach the bus bars. The advance lifts module power by 2 percentOB training Sandraage points. “

Another interesting new product being offered by Solarworld is the “Bisun” module, which is a bifacial solar module. Bifacials have been offered in the past by companies such as Canadian Solar and Sanyo, but the Solarworld will be the only one currently in production to my knowledge. The amount of additional power generated by bifacials depends greatly on the reflectivity of the surface that they are installed on and the method of install. An ideal install would be elevated and on a white membrane roof. Solarworld claims up to a 25% increase in power generation compared to a standard module of the same wattage. They are currently testing outputs at an install in VA.

The next training I attended was “Inverter Best Practices”, taught by Jeff Laughy from Solar Edge. It was a good overview of different inverter types, with a focus on SolarEdge inverters and optimizers. He discussed the significant impact recovery from shading that is possible by using MLPE (module level power electronics). Rhone ReschMLPEs include microinverters and power optimizers. Tests have indicated that if you are in an area that receives shading, you can recover 25% of the lost power by using MLPEs. According to SolarEdge, 60% of residential installs are currently using MLPE technology.

Jeff also spoke about SolarEdge’s partnership with Tesla in making a storage solution for grid tied systems. The StorEdge 7.6kW inverter and appropriate optimizers can be used with the Tesla Powerwall to create a grid tied solar system with a 6.4kW storage capacity.

The last session I attended on Wednesday was “Preparing for Disaster Resiliency”. Rick Williams, Director of the Columbia Region Leidos Maritime Solutions, has been working with Portland State University and others to come up with solutions to make the PV installs in the area more ready in the case of a large grid outage. They have been discussing establishing community centers that would allow residents to shelter in place.

Thursday I attended the “Grid Tied Battery Backup Systems” class, taught by Sandra Herrera and Brian Lawrence from Outback. We learned a lot about Radian system design and implementation. We also talked about the other products in Outback’s lineup that are suitable for grid tie with battery backup.

The 2016 OSEC was a whirlwind of learning, networking, and fun. There were several after-hours opportunities to mingle with other solar professionals, and it is always a pleasure to see the faces of my northwest solar friends. OSEC remains one of my favorite conferences because of its smaller size and ample training opportunities. See you there next year!